Jaguar I-Pace Production Is Put on Hold Because of Battery Issues

Jaguar Land Rover won’t be making their I-Pace electric SUV for the upcoming week, and the reason is a battery shortage at the supplier LG Chem. And there seems to be a theme with these electric vehicle batteries recently.

Even a Jaguar Needs Its Own Juice

The production halt was effective starting Monday, February 17, in Austria. This is at least the third time that a battery shortage has truly affected the production of an electric vehicle.

Jaguar I-Pace Production Is Put on Hold Because of Battery Issues

Jag’s competition – Hyundai fell behind on the production of its Ioniq EV back in 2017 because LG Chem was unable to keep up with the demand for its batteries. In April 2019, a supply shortage at LG Chem caused another competitor, Audi, to delay the deliveries of its first electric car, called the E-Tron. Audi subsequently cut its production targets for 2019 because of this issue. Mercedes-Benz also had some problems, which is why they had to lower their goals for sales of the EQC.

Batteries, Batteries, Batteries! Where Are They?

Representatives from Jaguar stated that the Land Rover has adjusted the production schedules of the Jaguar I-Pace in Graz because of temporary battery supplier scheduling issues. They are working with the supplier to minimize the impact on customer orders and resolve other issues.

Jaguar I-Pace Production Is Put on Hold Because of Battery Issues

Jaguar Land Rover also stated that the delay is related to LG Chem’s battery factory that is located in Poland. They would not offer any more information about the issue. A representative for LG Chem refused to comment.

Such delays, like the one Jaguar Land Rover that is experiencing with their brand new I-Pace model, help illustrate a point that’s often overlooked about the adoption of electric vehicles. It’s that huge, multi-billion-dollar promises that most automakers have made about their production rates are only as good as the battery suppliers they rely on. Facing internal pressures to avoid a too-successful EV launch or just a bad strategy? It will remain a mystery.